Of Maps and History

Submitted on Thursday 24 January 2013
The Image Permanence Institute has a new website called The Graphic Atlas, which is a resource designed to help in identifying printing techniques from the earliest printed images right up to the present. Do the "Guided Tour" and choose a printing technique for a sample, or try the "Identification" tab for a detailed explanation of each method. The site is well-designed and some of the graphic display is quite marvelous.
Submitted on Thursday 24 January 2013
The art installation "Mapping the Air," by Donna Parkinson and Sarah Vosmus, draws inspiration from Buckminster Fuller's famous Dymaxion Map.
Submitted on Tuesday 22 January 2013
OML staff will lead nine guest classes for USM courses, from six different programs, over the course of the Spring 2013 seminar.
Submitted on Thursday 17 January 2013
The Cartographic Collection at the Boston Athenaeum is impressively displayed here. From the website: "This digital collection features representative items from the Athenæum cartographic holdings containing thousands of sheet maps, plans, and charts, and more than 600 bound atlases. They range in date from the fifteenth to the twenty first centuries in date.
Submitted on Tuesday 15 January 2013
A recent PBS story drew attention to the series of "Green Books" that guided African Americans through segregated America, between 1936 and the passage of the Civil Rights Act in 1964.
Submitted on Sunday 13 January 2013
OML friend and donor Richard Auletta has just sent news of a wonderful tumblr feed ~ Transit Maps: Showing You How to get from Here to There ~ devoted to images of transit maps.
Submitted on Friday 11 January 2013
On BBC 2, hopefully available in the U.S. soon, Man Man Series 1 episode 1. William Roy’s Military Survey of Scotland. Nicholas Crane uses William Roy's pioneering military map of 18th-century Scotland.
Submitted on Friday 11 January 2013
The WBEZ radio program This American Life produced a show on mapping which originally aired 04 September 1998. Presented are five stories on individuals engaged in unusual mapping: a mapper of the details of New York City sidewalks; a cartographer of whatever strikes his fancy in Raleigh, NC; a mapper of sounds in his local environment; developing an electronic nose; a very personal map of touch. 
Submitted on Friday 11 January 2013
McGill University has a nice portal for their collection of Canadian county attlases, In Search of Your Canadian Past: The Canadian County Digital Atlas Project. A useful feature here is the ability to search the database for property owners listed within the atlases. Search for a particular name and find the map or maps on which that name appears.
Submitted on Thursday 10 January 2013
OML has acquired a small collection of private papers from the archives of Lemuel Moody (1767-1846), famous for his work in creating the Portland Observatory (1807-9). He also made and published, in 1825, a chart of Casco Bay and Portland harbor. This archive has much of interest about the history of the chart and of the navigation of Casco Bay (1825-1839). It also includes material about Moody’s sale of other charts and chronometers (1830-1841) and his scientific observations, such as his determination of the longitude of Munjoy Hill (1819-1835).