A Map of New-England, being the first that ever was here cut, and done by the best pattern that could be had, which being in some places defective, it made the other less exact yet doth it sufficiently shew the scituation of the Country, and conveniently

Collection: Osher Sheet Map Collection

Title: A Map of New-England, being the first that ever was here cut, and done by the best pattern that could be had, which being in some places defective, it made the other less exact yet doth it sufficiently shew the scituation of the Country, and conveniently well the distance of Places. The figures that are joyned with the Names of Places are to distinguish such as have been assaulted by the Indians from others.

Barcode: 492

Creator: Foster, John, 1648-1681, Hubbard, William, 1621 or 1622-1704

Printmaker: Foster, John, 1648-1681

Publisher: Foster, John, 1648-1681

Region Depicted: New England · Connecticut · Rhode Island · Massachusetts · Vermont · New Hampshire · Maine

Date Produced: 1677

Date Published: 1677

Language: English

Historical Context: This was the first map to be cut and printed in New England. It was probably designed by William Hubbard to illustrate his account of King Philip?s War (1675-76), and was printed from a 1677 woodcut by John Foster, who is considered to be North America?s first printmaker. The map has a rather primitive appearance and is acknowledged by its maker to be ?less exact.? Oriented with North to the right, the map?s vertical lines mark the northern and southern boundaries of the Massachusetts Bay Colony as set forth in the 1629 charter. Rhode Island is depicted as a small island near the base of Cape Cod (lower left), and Martha?s Vineyard is labeled ?Martins Vineyard.? The Connecticut River stretches across the top of the map, while the Merrimack River dominates the center, sprouting from a large, island-studded lake (Winnepesaukee). Situated to the far right (north) are ?The White Hills? of New Hampshire, later rendered as ?The Wine Hills? on a second edition of the map engraved and published in London. Foster associated the territorial region of ?New England? with a historical region of conflict between the English and the indigenous peoples. Numbers keyed to a table in the text indicates the locations of massacres and raids on the English. The following occurred in present-day Maine (lower right): No. 42, Kittery; No. 47, York; No. 50, Saco River; No. 51, Wells; No. 54, Scarborough; No. 55, Falmouth (now Portland).

Subjects: Foster, John, 1648-1681 · Hubbard, William, 1621 or 1622-1704 · New England · Connecticut · Rhode Island · Massachusetts · Vermont · New Hampshire · Maine · Maps--Early works to 1800 · Colonial America · King Philip's War, 1675-1676

Map Type: Geographical, Thematic, Historical

Dimensions: 30 x 38 cm.

Printing Process: Relief

Printing Technique: Wood

Material Type: Paper

Notes: The map illustrated William Hubbard's book "The Present State of New England : Being a narrative of the troubles with the Indians, 1677."

Brief Description: Map of New England showing settlements and rivers. Map is oriented with North to the right.

Physical Description: 1 map: illustrated

Theme: From Colonies to Local Control: Mapping North America, 1494 to 1867

Associated Map Imagery: Fox, 1677, A Map of New-England, being the first that ever was here cut, and done by the best pattern that could be had, which being in some places defective, it made the other less exact yet doth it sufficiently shew the scituation of the Country, and co, Animal, 1677, A Map of New-England, being the first that ever was here cut, and done by the best pattern that could be had, which being in some places defective, it made the other less exact yet doth it sufficiently shew the scituation of the Country, and, Figures, 1677, A Map of New-England, being the first that ever was here cut, and done by the best pattern that could be had, which being in some places defective, it made the other less exact yet doth it sufficiently shew the scituation of the Country, an, Bear, 1677, A Map of New-England, being the first that ever was here cut, and done by the best pattern that could be had, which being in some places defective, it made the other less exact yet doth it sufficiently shew the scituation of the Country, and c, Ship 1, 1677, A Map of New-England, being the first that ever was here cut, and done by the best pattern that could be had, which being in some places defective, it made the other less exact yet doth it sufficiently shew the scituation of the Country, and, Ship 2, 1677, A Map of New-England, being the first that ever was here cut, and done by the best pattern that could be had, which being in some places defective, it made the other less exact yet doth it sufficiently shew the scituation of the Country, and, Ship 3, 1677, A Map of New-England, being the first that ever was here cut, and done by the best pattern that could be had, which being in some places defective, it made the other less exact yet doth it sufficiently shew the scituation of the Country, and, Ship 4, 1677, A Map of New-England, being the first that ever was here cut, and done by the best pattern that could be had, which being in some places defective, it made the other less exact yet doth it sufficiently shew the scituation of the Country, and, Ship 5, 1677, A Map of New-England, being the first that ever was here cut, and done by the best pattern that could be had, which being in some places defective, it made the other less exact yet doth it sufficiently shew the scituation of the Country, and

Collection/Donor: Osher

Permanent URL: https://oshermaps.org/map/492.0001