Digital Exhibits

  • Bloodless Battles and Neverending Negotiations: Maine’s Nineteenth Century Boundary Dispute

    Between 1798 and 1842, Maine’s northern border was a point of hot contention between the English and the newly formed United States of America. The 1783 Treaty of Paris ended the American Revolution, but did not clearly determine a northern boundar...

  • References to the Fore

    References to the Fore! Local Boosters, Historians, and Engineers Map Antebellum Portland, Maine This special, online exhibition offers a history of the printed urban maps of Portland, Maine, from the early nineteenth century to the great fire of...

  • The Island of California

    Although cartographers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries knew California was not an island, they continued to depict it in this way. This exhibition explores the reasons behind this ridiculous cartographic error, which persisted for over tw...

  • Lemuel Moody and the Portland Observatory

    Lemuel Moody was born to a prominent Portland family in 1767. His father, Enoch, was a housewright and merchant, who encouraged his sons’ interest in the seafaring life. When Moody was 9, his brother, William, perished during the disastrous Penob...

  • Philosophy, Religion, and the Center of the Universe

    The maps in this online exhibition show some of the various relationships between reason and religion as the west attempted to find the center of the universe. Sometimes at odds with one another, religious and philosophical ideas may also coexist o...

  • Leo Beligcus and the War for Liberation

    Leo Belgicus, the allegorical representation of the Low Countries as a lion, was a popular image during the Eighty Years War for independence from the Spanish. Leo Belgicus first appeared in Michaël von Aitzing’s Novus de Leone Belgico, published ...

  • Traditional Japanese Cartography of the Edo Period

    The Edo Period (or Tokugawa Period), was a time of great stability and cultural preservation in Japan, lasting from 1603 to 1868. Tokugawa Ieyasu, the founder and first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate, was extremely suspicious of foreigners. He perm...

  • How the Barbarians Became Noble Savages: The Changing Image of Native Americans in European Cartography

    The European attitude towards the Other largely depended on the images and descriptions available to them. Images on grand, impressive maps were intended for intellectuals, who were interested in, not only geography, but also anthropology and ecolo...

  • 2017 Mapmaking Contest

      1. Maine "Maine"Avery B. of Cumberland, MaineGreely Middle School   2. Map of Europe "Map of Europe"Abby L. of Sebago, MaineSebago Elementary   3. Wonderland "Wonderland"Breanna K. of Winslow, MaineWinslow Ele...

  • Life, Liberty and the Representation of Space: Maps of the American Revolution

    The Osher Map Library’s collection of maps from and of the American Revolution may be divided into five major categories, based on who made them and what they were made for. Some were produced for planning military strategy. Others were intended to...